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Word of the Day Archives

A list of the past entries in our "Word of the Day" feature:

27-Apr-17 Variegate
[vair-ee-i-geyt] verb

To diversify; to invest with variety; to enliven with differences or changes, especially to render varied in colour or appearance.

example

Prompted by a desire to variegate her appearance she decided to streek her hair green and blue.
Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
26-Apr-17 Ninny
[nin-ee] noun

A simpleton; a fool.

example:

Perhaps I am a complete ninny because I love jumping in puddles on a rainy day.
Credit: http://www.oed.com.athena.rrc.mb.ca:2048/view/Entry/127209?rskey=Btowgx&result=1&isAdvanced=false#eid
25-Apr-17 Enthrall
[en-thrawl] verb

To ‘enslave’ mentally or morally. Now chiefly, to captivate, hold spellbound, by pleasing qualities.

example:

Usually it's the animal acts that quickly enthrall their audience at the circus.

Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
24-Apr-17 Missive
[mis-iv] noun, adjective

A written message, a letter, especially a long or official one; a missive letter.

example:

All employees received a missive outlining the new company policy on summer vacations.

Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
21-Apr-17 Populism
[pop-yuh-liz-uh m] noun

Any of various, often antiestablishment or anti-intellectual political movements or philosophies that offer unorthodox solutions or policies and appeal to the common person rather than according with traditional party or partisan ideologies.

example

Some pundits call the latest policital trend in the U.S. a form of populism.
Credit: Dictionary.com
20-Apr-17 Bromance
[broh-mans] noun

Intimate and affectionate friendship between men; a relationship between two men which is characterized by this. Also: a film focusing on such a relationship.

example

In the bromance movie "The Nice Guys", Russell Crowe and Ryan Gosling are two private detectives who join forces to solve a murder mystery.
Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
19-Apr-17 Genuflect
[jen-yoo-flekt] verb

To bend the knee, esp. in worship; to express a servile attitude.

example:

Sometimes the prudent action is to genuflect rather than oppose and accept that a difficult problem will have be addressed more slowly over time.
Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
18-Apr-17 Assiduous
[uh-sij-oo-uh s] adjective

Constant in application to the business in hand, persevering, sedulous, unwearyingly diligent.

example:

After two years and an assiduous effort they finally rebuilt their home that was damaged by the flood.


Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
13-Apr-17 Ignominious
[ig-nuh-min-ee-uh s] adjective

Full of ignominy; involving shame, disgrace, or obloquy; shameful, disgraceful, discreditable.

example:

I suffered an ignominious defeat playing online scrabble with my upstart sister.
Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
12-Apr-17 Muddle
[muhd-l]  verb, noun

To bungle or mismanage (an undertaking, etc.); to deal ineptly or incompetently with; to attain one's object by good fortune rather than good management.

example:

I was lucky to muddle through the assignment and still get a decent grade.
Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
11-Apr-17 Devout
[dih-vout] adjective / noun

Devoted to divine worship or service; solemn and reverential in religious exercises; pious, religious.

example:

The devout practice of daily prayer is important in many religions.


Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
10-Apr-17 Diatribe
[dahy-uh-trahyb]  noun

A dissertation or discourse directed against some person or work; a bitter and violent criticism; an invective.

example:

The customer in front of me unleashed a severe diatribe to the unsuspecting sales clerk about the service he had received.

Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
07-Apr-17 denouement
[dey-noo-mahn]  noun

Unravelling; specifically the final unravelling of the complications of a plot in a drama, novel, etc.; the catastrophe; the final solution or issue of a complication, difficulty, or mystery.

example

Though heartbreaking, thankfully the movie's denouement led to its final moments which depicted life's rebirth and renewal.
Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
06-Apr-17 Faux
[foh] adjective

False, fake, ersatz. Of personal behaviour: feigned, affected, disingenuous. Of a material: synthetic, artificial, made in imitation (often as a cheaper substitute).

example:

Her faux leather jacket provides little insulation from the cold winter weather.  
Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
05-Apr-17 Bling
[bling] noun (slang)

(A piece of) ostentatious jewellery. Expensive and flashy jewellery, clothing, or other possessions.

example:

Except for the car, most of the prizes were assorted bling donated by sponsors.
Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
04-Apr-17 Colloquial
[kuh-loh-kwee-uh l] adjective

Belonging to common speech; characteristic of or proper to ordinary conversation, as distinguished from formal or elevated language.

example:

Calling someone a 'big sook' or a crybaby are colloquial phrases used to refer to a timid and cowardly person.
Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
03-Apr-17 Spoonerism
[spoo-nuh-riz-uh m] noun

An accidental transposition of the initial sounds, or other parts, of two or more words.  i.e. as in a blushing crow for a crushing blow.

example:

The silly spoonerism he made while giving his speech, referring to the plaster man instead of the master plan, made everyone laugh.

Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
31-Mar-17 Stoic
[stoh-ik] noun, adjective

One who practises repression of emotion, indifference to pleasure or pain, and patient endurance.

example:

The stoic in her saw little point in trying to influence the opinions of others.
Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
30-Mar-17 Exuberant
[ig-zoo-ber-uh nt] adjective

Of persons, their actions or expressions: Effusive in display of feeling. Now more usually, Abounding in health and spirits, overflowing with delight.

example:

Winning the 649 lottery was such an exuberant moment that I still don't believe it really happened.
Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
29-Mar-17 Anoint
[uh-noint] verb

To smear or rub over (medicinally or cosmetically) with oil or unguent; to besmear with flattery; to ‘butter’; to consecrate or make sacred in a ceremony that includes the token applying of oil

example:

Even though she is already doing the work, she is concerned that they choose her to continue in the position on the basis of merit after a competition and not merely anoint her.
Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
28-Mar-17 Bigly
[big-li] adverb

With great force; firmly, violently; (also) stoutly, strongly. Loudly, boastfully; proudly, haughtily, pompously.

example:

Some people think so bigly of themselves, myself included, and frankly it's hard to understand why.
Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
27-Mar-17 Shambolic
[sham-bol-ik] adjective

Chaotic, disorderly, undisciplined.

example:

My locker is in such a shambolic state that I fear something falling on me if I open the door.

Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
24-Mar-17 Skedaddle
[ski-dad-l] verb, noun

To go away, leave, or depart hurriedly; to run away, ‘clear out’.

example:

After unintentionally breaking the school's window they chose to skedaddle rather than face the consequences.
Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
23-Mar-17 Gad
[gad] verb

To go from one place to another, to wander; esp. to wander about with no serious object, stopping here and there, to rove idly.

example:

I was glad to have some time to gad about without any particular purpose before returning from vacation.
Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
22-Mar-17 Anemic
[uh-nee-mik] adjective

Bloodless; ill-supplied with blood, or having blood of poor quality;  lacking in vigour, strength, or spirit.

example:

We were so tired from working that we only managed an anemic effort to clean up before going to bed.
Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
21-Mar-17 Prudent
[prood-nt] adjective

acting with or showing forethought; having or exercising sound judgement in practical or financial affairs; circumspect, discreet, cautious; far-sighted

example:

Investing from an early age for your retirement is thought to be a prudent idea.


Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
20-Mar-17 Eponymous
[uh-pon-uh-muh s] adjective

That gives [their] name to anything; giving one's name to a tribe, place, etc.

example:

Each year many of the eponymous bursaries that generous philanthropists have created to benefit RRC students are not be applied for.  

Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
17-Mar-17 Prosaic

[proh-zey-ik] adjective

Of language or writing: having the character, style, or diction of prose as opposed to poetry; plainly or simply worded; lacking in poetic expression, feeling, or imagination.  Of a person or thing: unpoetic, unromantic; dull, flat, unexciting; commonplace, mundane.

example:

The prosaic manner with which they described their meeting with the pop star made it seem quite ordinary.

Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
16-Mar-17 Plop
[plop] verb, noun, adverb

An abrupt hollow sound, as of a small solid object dropping into water without a splash.  To fall or move with or as with a plop, esp. when, or as if, landing in water.

example:

She heard the earring plop when it fell into the sink.

Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
15-Mar-17 Ruse
[rooz] noun

A trick, stratagem, or wile.

example:

I had no clue that sending me to the store was merely a ruse to allow them time to set up for the surprise party.
Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
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