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Word of the Day Archives

A list of the past entries in our "Word of the Day" feature:

24-Mar-17 Skedaddle
[ski-dad-l] verb, noun

To go away, leave, or depart hurriedly; to run away, ‘clear out’.

example:

After unintentionally breaking the school's window they chose to skedaddle rather than face the consequences.
Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
23-Mar-17 Gad
[gad] verb

To go from one place to another, to wander; esp. to wander about with no serious object, stopping here and there, to rove idly.

example:

I was glad to have some time to gad about without any particular purpose before returning from vacation.
Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
22-Mar-17 Anemic
[uh-nee-mik] adjective

Bloodless; ill-supplied with blood, or having blood of poor quality;  lacking in vigour, strength, or spirit.

example:

We were so tired from working that we only managed an anemic effort to clean up before going to bed.
Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
21-Mar-17 Prudent
[prood-nt] adjective

acting with or showing forethought; having or exercising sound judgement in practical or financial affairs; circumspect, discreet, cautious; far-sighted

example:

Investing from an early age for your retirement is thought to be a prudent idea.


Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
20-Mar-17 Eponymous
[uh-pon-uh-muh s] adjective

That gives [their] name to anything; giving one's name to a tribe, place, etc.

example:

Each year many of the eponymous bursaries that generous philanthropists have created to benefit RRC students are not be applied for.  

Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
17-Mar-17 Prosaic

[proh-zey-ik] adjective

Of language or writing: having the character, style, or diction of prose as opposed to poetry; plainly or simply worded; lacking in poetic expression, feeling, or imagination.  Of a person or thing: unpoetic, unromantic; dull, flat, unexciting; commonplace, mundane.

example:

The prosaic manner with which they described their meeting with the pop star made it seem quite ordinary.

Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
16-Mar-17 Plop
[plop] verb, noun, adverb

An abrupt hollow sound, as of a small solid object dropping into water without a splash.  To fall or move with or as with a plop, esp. when, or as if, landing in water.

example:

She heard the earring plop when it fell into the sink.

Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
15-Mar-17 Ruse
[rooz] noun

A trick, stratagem, or wile.

example:

I had no clue that sending me to the store was merely a ruse to allow them time to set up for the surprise party.
Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
14-Mar-17 Meme
[meem] noun

An image, video, piece of text, etc., typically humorous in nature, that is copied and spread rapidly by Internet users, often with slight variations.

example:

 I just want to rant every time I see that grumpy cat meme.
Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
13-Mar-17 Meander
[mee-an-der] verb

to wander aimlessly; to follow a circuitous course.

example:

Sometimes taking a moment to meander through the book stacks in the Library can be a great way to relax.
Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
10-Mar-17 Circuitous
[ser-kyoo-i-tuh s] adjective

Of the nature of a circuit, roundabout, indirect.

example:

Inevitably I will take a circuitous route to the dentist to forestall  arriving too soon.
Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
09-Mar-17 Schism
[skiz-uh m] noun

a division into mutually opposing parties of a body of persons that have previously acted in concert. Also, in recent use, a severance of unity, a discord, breach (between persons or things).

example:

Strongly opposed views towards composting eventually created a schism amongst neighbours in the otherwise happy community.
Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
08-Mar-17 Filibuster
[fil-uh-buhs-ter] noun

The use of irregular or obstructive tactics by a member of a legislative assembly to prevent the adoption of a measure generally favored or to force a decision against the will of the majority.

example:

Unable to convince council to change the bylaw, the member instead tried to filibuster by raising procedural questions.
Credit: Dictionary.com
07-Mar-17 Dais
[dey-is] noun

A raised table in a hall, at which distinguished persons sat at feasts, etc.; the high table.  The platform of a lecture hall

example:

On the way up to the lectern I tripped on the dais and almost fell.


Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
06-Mar-17 Surreal
[suh-ree-uh l] adjective

Having the qualities of surrealist art; bizarre, dreamlike; having the disorienting, hallucinatory quality of a dream; unreal; fantastic

example:

Walking on the snow covered prairie completely surrounded by dense, white fog was a surreal, eerie and other worldly experience.

Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
03-Mar-17 Animus
[an-uh-muh s] noun
 
The rational soul; mind, will, spirit. Feeling or intention that motivates a person to act in a particular (esp. hostile) way; C. G. Jung's term for: an archetype present in a man or woman from which the male aspects of the personality are derived.

example:

Only pure animus could drive an individual to act so aggressively.  

Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
02-Mar-17 Bogeyman (i.e. bogy)
[boo g-ee-man] noun

As quasi-proper name: The evil one, the devil. A bogle or goblin; a person much dreaded.

example:

His tall stature and dishevelled appearance frightened the neighbourhood children who often referred to him as the bogeyman.
Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
01-Mar-17 Tiff
[tif] noun

A slight outburst or fit of temper; a slight or petty quarrel; a temporary ill-humoured disagreement;

example:

Once again I was late, and it took an extremely creative excuse to avoid a tiff with my girl friend.

Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
28-Feb-17 Leonine
[lee-uh-nahyn] adjective

Resembling a lion or that of a lion; lion-like

example:

Her new shaggy leonine hair style garnered considerable attention from coworkers.
Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
27-Feb-17 Effectuate
[ih-fek-choo-eyt] verb (used with object)

To bring to pass (an event); to carry into effect, accomplish (an intention, desire).

example:

People often refer to 'thinking outside the box' as the only way to effectuate improvement.
Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
24-Feb-17 Xenophobia
[zen-uh-foh-bee-uh] noun

A deep antipathy to foreigners.  Fear or hatred of foreigners, people from different cultures, or strangers

example:

Several observers have declared that the real reason for the government's restriction of immigration and trade with select countries is an underlying xenophobia.

Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
23-Feb-17 Titular [tich-uh-ler]
adjective

exists or is such only in title or name, as distinct from real or actual; holding or bearing a title without exercising the functions implied by it

example:

As the representative of the Queen, David Johnston, the Governor General of Canada is the titular head of Canadian government but our Prime Minister has the real power.
Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
22-Feb-17 Fulminate
[fuhl-muh-neyt] verb

To censure, to condemn; to denounce vehemently or in scathing terms

example:

People were very quick to fulminate against the terrorist attack.
Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
21-Feb-17 Demagogue
[dem-uh-gog] noun

A popular leader who espoused the cause of the people against any other party in the state.   In a bad sense: a political agitator who appeals to the passions and prejudices of the mob in order to obtain power or further his own interests; an unprincipled or factious popular orator.

example:

How can we know if a politician is a good candidate for office or a potential demagogue?
Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
17-Feb-17 Bibulous
[bib-yuh-luh s] adjective

Absorbent of moisture.  Addicted to drinking or tippling.

example:

The cranky old publisher warned the young writer to "avoid the bibulous habits of others or you won't survive in this cutthroat business."

Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
16-Feb-17 Nefarious
[ni-fair-ee-uh s] adjective

Wicked, iniquitous, villainous, despicable.

example:

I was convinced that a nefarious person had intentionally sabotaged the brakes on my bicycle so I called the police.

Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
15-Feb-17 Prescience
[presh-uh ns] noun

Knowledge of events before they happen; foreknowledge.

example:

It seems like a time of uncertainty as if a calamitous prescience has gripped the world.
Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
14-Feb-17 Sanctimonious
[sangk-tuh-moh-nee-uh s] adjective

Of pretended or assumed sanctity or piety, making a show of sanctity, affecting the appearance of sanctity. Making a hypocritical show of religious devotion, piety, righteousness

example:

I was not being the least bit sanctimonious when I accused my piano teacher of exaggerating about my lack of musicianship.
 
Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
13-Feb-17 Copious
[koh-pee-uh s] adjective

Existing in rich abundance; plentiful; abundant. Now chiefly used with nouns expressing production or supply, or in reference to quantity produced; with names of material substances

example:

The copious wealth of some individuals in comparison to the general population of a country can be viewed as a weakness in its economy and social fabric. 
Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
10-Feb-17 Literary
[lit-uh-rer-ee] adjective

Of or relating to the writing, study, or content of literature, esp. of the kind valued for quality of form; of the nature of literature.

example:

I restrict my literary asperations to occasionally reading fiction, specifically mysteries.
Credit: Oxford English Dictionary / Dictionary.com
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