Red River College Library

Word of the Day Archives

Past entries from our "Word of the Day" feature. Would you like to suggest a word of the day?

19-Aug-19 Bask
verb
[bahsk]

to lie in or be exposed to a pleasant warmth; to enjoy a pleasant situation

example:

I was too exhausted after the game to bask in our victory.


Credit: Dictionary.com | Submitted by: John Mark
16-Aug-19 tânitahto
 /tân-/ + tahto  ᑖᓂᑕᐦᑐ
A phrase in the Cree language with two "indeclineable particles", táni- and –tahto   meaning "how many"

example:

Tánitahto ayácik anik asikanak?
(How many of those socks do you have?)





Credit: Plains Cree Dictionary | Submitted by: Ida Bear
15-Aug-19 Abet
verb (used with object)
[uh-bet]

to encourage, support, or countenance by aid or approval, usually in wrongdoing

example:

Though he often begs, I try not to abet our dog stealing food from the table by feeding him the food that we eat. 

Credit: Dictionary.com | Submitted by: John Mark
14-Aug-19 Inveigle
verb (used with object)
[in-vey-guhl]

to entice, lure, or ensnare by flattery or artful talk or inducements (usually followed by into); to acquire, win, or obtain by beguiling talk or methods (usually followed by from or away)

example:

I managed to inveigle my way into a tryout by suggesting I'd already played for other soccer teams.

Credit: Dictionary.com | Submitted by: John Mark
13-Aug-19 Flagrant
adjective
[fley-gruhnt]

shockingly noticeable or evident; obvious; glaring; notorious; scandalous

example:

Her decision to wear a garish outfit to the event was a flagrant attempt to attract attention to herself.   


Credit: Dictionary.com | Submitted by: John Mark
12-Aug-19 Enabler
noun
[en-ey-buhl-er]

A person or thing that makes something possible; a person who encourages or enables negative or self-destructive behaviour in another

example:

I was the enabler because it was me who gave my little niece the crayons.

Credit: Oxford English Dictionary | Submitted by: John Mark
09-Aug-19 Prognostications
noun
[prog-nos-ti-key-shuh n]

the act of forecasting or predicting (something future) from present indications or signs; a forecast or prediction

example:

All the dire prognostications my friends expressed about moving to a rural home proved false.  


Credit: Dictionary.com | Submitted by: John Mark
08-Aug-19 Caliber
noun
[kal-uh-ber]

degree of capacity or competence; ability:  degree of merit or excellence; quality

example:

More than 1,800 students are involved in high caliber research that is undertaken at Red River College.

Credit: Dictionary.com | Submitted by: John Mark
07-Aug-19 Nugatory
adjective
[noo-guh-tawr-ee]

of no real value; trifling; worthless; of no force or effect; ineffective; futile; vain; not valid

example:

We had sloped our property to channel rain water away from the house but the intensity of the storm rendered that nugatory.


Credit: Dictionary.com | Submitted by: John Mark
06-Aug-19 Impunity
noun
[im-pyoo-ni-tee]

exemption from punishment; immunity from detrimental effects, as of an action

example:

We strolled through the beautiful meadow with impunity, not realizing we were on private property.

Credit: Dictionary.com | Submitted by: John Mark
02-Aug-19 Maelstrom
noun
[meyl-struhm]

a large, powerful, or violent whirlpool; a restless, disordered, or tumultuous state of affairs

example:

We came early and avoided the maelstrom of students trying to find their classes.

Credit: Dictionary.com | Submitted by: John Mark
01-Aug-19 Atrocious
adjective
[uh-troh-shuhs]

extremely or shockingly wicked, cruel, or brutal; shockingly bad or tasteless; dreadful; abominable

example:

It was atrocious how the dealership reneged on the warranty and refused to fix our car.   

Credit: Dictionary.com | Submitted by: John Mark
31-Jul-19 Quibble
noun; verb
[kwib-uhl]

an instance of the use of ambiguous, prevaricating, or irrelevant language or arguments to evade a point at issue; to equivocate

example:

It was expensive but I decided why quibble over the price of a haircut, if you're happy with the result. 

Credit: Dictionary.com | Submitted by: John Mark
30-Jul-19 Slacktivism
noun
[slak-tuh-viz-uh m]

actions taken to bring about political or social change but requiring only minimal commitment, effort, or risk

example:

Climate change is a very serious concern yet we are so invested in our way of life that perhaps our own slacktivism is defeating us.

Credit: Dictionary.com | Submitted by: John Mark
29-Jul-19 Dubious
adjective
[doo-bee-uhs]

doubtful; marked by or occasioning doubt; of uncertain outcome; wavering or hesitating in opinion; inclined to doubt

example:

Going on the roller-coaster right after lunch was a dubious idea but we did it anyway.


Credit: Dictionary.com | Submitted by: John Mark
26-Jul-19 Humblebrag
noun
[huhm-buh l-brag]

a statement intended as a boast or brag but disguised by a humble apology, complaint, etc.

example:

Believe me when I say that this is no humblebrag, and I am genuinely sorry for soundly defeating you in every game of checkers we've ever played.

Credit: Dictionary.com | Submitted by: John Mark
25-Jul-19 Stoical
adjective
[stoh-i-kuhl]

impassive; characterized by a calm, austere fortitude

example:

I tried to remain stoical as it rained constantly while I was on my vacation.

Credit: Dictionary.com | Submitted by: John Mark
24-Jul-19 Moot
adjective
[moot]

open to discussion or debate; debatable; doubtful; of little or no practical value, meaning, or relevance; purely academic

example:

At the end of the day, who actually left the garage door open all night long was a moot point because all our bicycles were stolen.

Credit: Dictionary.com | Submitted by: John Mark
23-Jul-19 Vile
adjective
[vahyl]

wretchedly bad; highly offensive, unpleasant; repulsive or disgusting, as to the senses or feelings; morally debased, depraved, or despicable; foul; filthy

example:

A vile stench remained in the house left-over after the flood waters receded.


Credit: Dictionary.com | Submitted by: John Mark
22-Jul-19 Bluster
noun
[bluhs-ter]

boisterous noise and violence; noisy, empty threats or protests; inflated talk

example:

We spent fruitless hours listening to bluster and bombast before finally getting down to bargaining.

Credit: Dictionary.com | Submitted by: John Mark
19-Jul-19 Empower
verb
[em-pou-er]

to give power or authority to; authorize, especially by legal or official means; to enable or permit

example:

We empower ourselves through reading and being open to learn. 


Credit: Dictionary.com | Submitted by: John Mark
18-Jul-19 Dystopian
adjective
[dis-toh-pee-uh n]

related to a society characterized by human misery, as squalor, oppression, disease, and overcrowding

example:

It was hard to believe how quickly their lives had become a dystopian nightmare after the tornado struck.

Credit: Dictionary.com | Submitted by: John Mark
17-Jul-19 Inscrutable
adjective
[in-skroo-tuh-buhl]

incapable of being investigated, analyzed, or scrutinized; impenetrable; not easily understood; mysterious; unfathomable

example:

It was an inscrutable mystery how our dog escaped the kennel.  

Credit: Dictionary.com | Submitted by: John Mark
16-Jul-19 Ancillary
adjective
[an-suh-ler-ee]

subordinate; subsidiary; auxiliary; assisting

example:

The lighting crew provides a vital ancillary service in the creation of a film or video. 


Credit: Dictionary.com | Submitted by: John Mark
15-Jul-19 Trepidation
noun
[trep-i-dey-shuhn]

tremulous fear, alarm, or agitation; perturbation; trembling or quivering movement; tremor

example:

When I received my diploma, I felt a mixture of excitement and trepidation standing in front of the audience.

Credit: Dictionary.com | Submitted by: John Mark
12-Jul-19 Intransigent
adjective
[in-tran-si-juh nt]

refusing to agree or compromise; uncompromising; inflexible

example:

They agreed to allow us to rent the space but were intransigent about when we could begin to occupy it.

Credit: Dictionary.com | Submitted by: John Mark
11-Jul-19 Narcissism
noun
[nahr-suh-siz-em]

inordinate fascination with oneself; excessive self-love; vanity

example:

The individual talked at such length about themselves that I considered it to be narcissism.

Credit: Dictionary.com | Submitted by: John Mark
10-Jul-19 Arduous
adjective
[ahr-joo-uhs]

requiring great exertion; laborious; difficult

example:

The fifteen hour flight from Vancouver to Sydney, Australia was the most arduous part of the trip.

Credit: Dictionary.com | Submitted by: John Mark
09-Jul-19 Aaniin
Aaniin
interjection used in the Anishinaabemowin language of the Ojibwe (Anishinabe) people meaning:  hello!; greetings! (Usage: As a greeting to one or all people; when people meet in person - or in speaking, reading and writing)

Example:

Aaniin boozhoo my friend, how are you?

Credit: Ojibwe People's Dictionary | Submitted by: Adrian Johnson and Corey Whitford
08-Jul-19 Vociferous
adjective
[voh-sif-er-uhs]

crying out noisily; clamorous

example:

I would have gotten a good night's sleep if had not been for the vociferous caterwaul of a cat outside my bedroom window.

Credit: Dictionary.com | Submitted by: John Mark
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